Glock 43

8.0
8.0 score
[Editors rating (8.0) + Users rating (9.2)] / 2 = (TheGearHunt) score (8.0)/10


1
Editor rating: 8.0 / 10
User's rating: based on 59 user ratings
1 star
0%
2 star
5%
3 star
6%
4 star
13%
5 star
74%
Add your Rating
Glock 43 Review Facts

The Glock 43 was among highly anticipated pistols. It posed some challenging design options for the Glock. A semi-automatic was needed that was different enough from earlier models to satisfy the market of narrow-framed 9mms while retaining the signature shape Glock fans expect. The Glock 43 does not disappoint.

The main selling point of the Glock 43 is its diminutive size. The greatest advantage of the G43 is that it is a Glock. The G43 uses all ammunition and delivers a reliable bang every time. Those features are the hallmark of the brand.

It has added appeal because it is easy to clean and a predictable trigger. Testers have rated the Glock 43 reliability and ergonomics as five out of five. Nothing makes the Glock balk. The Glock 43 is extremely accurate for its intended use and comfortable enough to use at the range.

It is not the market’s smallest option but is very shootable. The best review of a pistol takes place on the range. When a gun does well, the shooter enjoys the shooting session. A weapon that doesn’t run well provides a collection of critical data. The Glock 43 fits into the ‘fun’ category.

Editor's Pros & Cons
Pros
  • Aftermarket accessories and components are available
  • Earns the Glock reputation for reliability
  • Feels comfortable in the hand
  • Highly concealable
  • Lightweight
  • Simple design with no needless gadgetry or levers
Cons
  • Nearly nonexistent grip
  • No Picatinny rail
  • Some dislike the heavy weight of the trigger
  • Trigger guard may cause middle finger discomfort
Primary Use

Primary Use

The Glock 43 is not for someone with large hands. The 43 is best suited for point-blank shooting. The Glock can be holstered like a wallet. Carried in an IBW holster, the 43 is the epitome of discretion.

Load a flush bottomed mag; rack the gun, being careful to avoid covering the ejection port; holster up; and tuck a shirt over the pistol. Outside the waistband holster serves equally well. The G43 is light and small enough to carry in the pocket.

Nothing is as convenient and discreet as a pocket carry pistol. Extraction practice is of importance. It is better to have pistole and not need it than to need and not have because a person feels it is too big of a hassle to carry.

It feels familiar for those who have experience with Glocks. Small gun shooting is sometimes an exercise in masochism. The G43 is thinner than other models but does not dole out the abuse to the hand as some thin pistols do.

The pull motion has a crisp break and an obvious reset. Those who like the trigger of the Glock feel at home with the G43 pull. The Glock 43 is more of a combat handgun than a small back-up gun. The G43 is sufficiently accurate for the intended use. It produces groups that range from 1.56 to 2.33 inches when shooting at targets seven yards away.

It is perfectly suited for concealed carry or a backup pistol for law enforcement officers. The G43 is not a sporting pistol. It is meant to be used for self-defense. The design and size appeal to many people who are looking for a concealed carry gun.

The wants and needs of people have changed over the last two decades. The pistol works well as an in waistband handgun. For most people, the limited magazine capacity is nothing for which to be concerned.

Reduced capacity increases convenience. As people’s circumstances change, so does the gun they select. One tester found the IWB carry to be the only plausible way to conceal the weapon. He tried cargo pants pockets and a selection of holsters and found none that worked for him. Ankle carry does work but is not the preferred location for one’s primary weapon.
Barrel

Barrel

The Glock 43 has a U-shaped sight that is standard for Glocks. It seems a bit large for a small gun, which is an advantage. A school of thought is all self-defense guns need standard night sights which, which makes sense.

The sight system is a Glock standard. In the rear is a white polymer outline notch that is drift-adjustable and a white polymer dot unit in the front. A raised ridge located on the frame’s left side prevents the slide catch.

It cannot inadvertently bump into the slide lock during recoil by the shooting end thumb. The magazine has a finger extension that provides enough band on the pistol to minimize muzzle flip.
Stock Options

Stock Options

It has a sure grip that feels natural, especially when using the pink extension equipped magazine. The grip frame has a front strap that is flat and a back strap that features a fixed lower arch.

The grip surface on all four sides is lightly textured with pyramidal, blunted, small bumps. It is no aggressively textured which is an advantage for deep concealment. It does not help with the recoil management when hot 9mm loads are fired.

The overall shape of the grip is quite comfortable. The shooting hand is protected from the slide by a distinctive beavertail that curves downward. The six-round capacity is likely the feature that drives the most complaints.

An elongated grip frame that accommodates another round or two would push the profile of the grip to the height of compact models. The flat magazine base causes the height of the grip to be that of sub-compacts.

The magazine with the extension base plate causes the gun to fit medium size hands but no larger. The shooter sacrifices magazine capacity for comfort and concealability when transitioning to the Glock 43.
Weight

Weight

It is lighter than the G42. The gun weighs 17.25 ounces. The price and limited six-round capacity are the worst aspects of the Glock 43. However, it is an acceptably powerful, comfortable, reliable, and small everyday carry pistol. A compact 9mm Luger pistol made specifically for concealing and carry is not a new concept.
Accessories

Accessories

Because the Glock is so popular, lasers, replacement triggers, sights, and lights are likely to be added. Glock has never thrown in a magazine plus-one extension. It is unlikely they will do so in the future. Aftermath components are required to embellish the G43 magazines.

In anticipation of the release of the G43, holster makers wanted to provide carry options. There is a wide variety from which to choose. Accessory manufacturers also jumped into the Glock 43 market. There are multiple laser and light attachments available.
Ammunition

Ammunition

The G43 comes with both an extended and flush-fit magazine. The flash-mount mag is the ultimate in concealability. The extended magazine may not fit in pant with small pockets. The magazines hold six rounds.

The 43 is a 9mm pocket pistol that is an ammunition omnivore. The single-stack pistol has been put through the paces with various 9mm loads. The ammo ranged from practice-grade to high-end, +P cartridges to standard pressure, defensive loads, and bullet weights that ranged from 74 to 147 grains.

The gun digested all the ammunition without malfunction. Ammunition included hollow points and ball loads with a gamut of velocities and pressures. Ammo used in the Glock 43 includes Magtech, UMC, Remington, Federal Premium and Winchester White Box.

The Winchester 147-grain Train & Defend, 124-grain Remington Golden Sabers and 124-grain Hornady XTPs have been used. Testers did not have a single feed or eject failure or lead thrown downrange in a hurry.

For some loads, registered velocities were closer to duty-sized pistols. A few feet is unlikely to make a difference when shooting in self-defense. An extra 30 to 40 feet per second can help 9mm hollow point bullets expand in the flesh after coming in contact with clothing.
Loading

Loading

For a pistol that is so small, it is snappy. Function depends on accuracy. The Glock 43 is a self-defense pistol that is accurate from a distance of zero to seven yards. The sight radius is a respectable 5.2 inches.

The shooter is advised to aim before the trigger is pulled. When slow-fired, the gun is capable of ten-ring accuracy at distances beyond seven yards. The trigger of the 43 is not an improvement or worse than other Glock triggers.

It has an advertised 5.5 pounds of pull and a hard to miss reset click. Being able to shoot one Glock means the shooter can shoot any Glock. Those who lack trigger discipline may need a harder, longer trigger pull like that of some small semi or snub-nosed revolvers.

Like other Glocks, the G43 contains the Safe-Action trigger, locked-break barrel that is short recoil operated, and striker ignition system. The Gen4 recoil assembly has steel support strategically located, a polymer guide rod, and dual recoil springs.

The button for the magazine release is reversible for shooters that are left-handed. The trigger stroke is the typical Glock stroke that has a short reset, a distinctive break, and a slightly mushy take-up.

The magazine locks firmly into place and drops free when the release is pressed. The slide is easy to manipulate. The controls work properly. The Lyman trigger gauge registers a six-pound, two-ounce pull. The pull is heavy compared to the advertised 5.5 pounds. Finger placement impacts the trigger pull.

The level of recoil produced is respectable but not uncomfortable. Loads with bullets that weigh less than 115 grains usually bring the recoil level to be moderate or modest. The +P ammo delivers a stout to uncomfortable recoil level.

The Glock performs with 100 percent reliability. Short-barreled pistols have an expected velocity drop when compared to large handguns. There is a drop in velocity with the G43, but sometimes less than expected.
Finish

Finish

For a pistol that is so small, it is snappy. Function depends on accuracy. The Glock 43 is a self-defense pistol that is accurate from a distance of zero to seven yards. The sight radius is a respectable 5.2 inches.

The shooter is advised to aim before the trigger is pulled. When slow-fired, the gun is capable of ten-ring accuracy at distances beyond seven yards. The trigger of the 43 is not an improvement or worse than other Glock triggers.

It has an advertised 5.5 pounds of pull and a hard to miss reset click. Being able to shoot one Glock means the shooter can shoot any Glock. Those who lack trigger discipline may need a harder, longer trigger pull like that of some small semi or snub-nosed revolvers.

Like other Glocks, the G43 contains the Safe-Action trigger, locked-break barrel that is short recoil operated, and striker ignition system. The Gen4 recoil assembly has steel support strategically located, a polymer guide rod, and dual recoil springs.

The button for the magazine release is reversible for shooters that are left-handed. The trigger stroke is the typical Glock stroke that has a short reset, a distinctive break, and a slightly mushy take-up.

The magazine locks firmly into place and drops free when the release is pressed. The slide is easy to manipulate. The controls work properly. The Lyman trigger gauge registers a six-pound, two-ounce pull. The pull is heavy compared to the advertised 5.5 pounds. Finger placement impacts the trigger pull.

The level of recoil produced is respectable but not uncomfortable. Loads with bullets that weigh less than 115 grains usually bring the recoil level to be moderate or modest. The +P ammo delivers a stout to uncomfortable recoil level.

The Glock performs with 100 percent reliability. Short-barreled pistols have an expected velocity drop when compared to large handguns. There is a drop in velocity with the G43, but sometimes less than expected.
Safety

Safety

The Glock 43 does not have a frame-mounted safety and will likely never have. The plunger of the enlarged firing pin safety has an irregular, beveled surface.
Key Features

Key Features

* 3.39-inch
* 4.25-inch height
* 6.26-inch overall length
* 6-round capacity
* 17.25-ounce weight
* $529 MSRP
Bottom Line

Bottom Line

Within the last ten years, a growing demand for single-stack 9mm pistols that are easier for concealed carry has developed. Stack pistols have a small footprint and flat profile compared to pocket .380s.

Though it was fashionably late in coming, it made a grand appearance. It is an excellent gun, but not made for everyone. The level of stopping power is on par with the .38 Special J-frame revolver.

Other manufacturers such as Springfield, Smith & Wesson, and Taurus have jumped on the single-stack bandwagon. Glock has more than 20 years of history and has earned the reputation of being among the top combat pistol providers in the world.

The company relies on law enforcement and military contracts for its bread and butter. These days, there seems to be greater interest in meeting demands of civilians. The G43 meets or exceeds expectations on the shooting range. As a concealable defensive handgun, it is well-balanced.